Tag Archives: libraries

Bookish snippets…

The past couple of months have been filled with all sorts of bookish projects and shenanigans, hence the little blogging break… So, without further ado, here’s what’s been happening!

Big Telly Theatre project

Back in January I was one of various Northern Irish writers approached by Big Telly Theatre Company to submit a proposal for an exciting new project called Sea Gods, Shipwrecks and Sidhe Folk – Treasures of the Causeway. Fast-forward to February and I was delighted to hear that I’d been chosen as one of four NI writers to contribute to the project, those writers being myself, Jane Talbot, Moyra Donaldson and Dominic Montague.

Big telly

(L-R) Dominic, me, Jane, Zoe, Moyra, Linda and Wes

Essentially, we’ll be writing original stories about eight different sites along the Causeway Coast, using the archaeology and mythology of each for inspiration. The narratives will then be recorded by local actors, with an audio installation placed at the locations for visitors to enjoy. I’m working on a story linked to the Lissanduff earthworks/raths in Portballintrae, which is close to my home and a location I’m very familiar with. I’m looking forward to seeing all the stories come together soon!

Giant’s Causeway Book Club

Since my last blog we’ve enjoyed two further GC Book Club meetings. January saw us chatting about our December/January reads – The Explorer by Katherine Rundell and Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde by RL Stevenson. We scored the former 8.6/10 and the latter 6.9/10 (being very specific now by including the decimals!) We thought The Explorer was very well written, with strong, interesting characters and an original narrative, while Jekyll & Hyde was atmospheric and interesting, despite everyone obviously knowing the ending already.

For February, our selected book was a modern fantasy classic – Little, Big by John Crowley. Not everyone had finished this one as it’s very long, at over 500 pages, with very small font, but we went ahead and scored it anyway and it got a respectable 6/10. Personally, I loved this book and scored it 10/10 as I think the writing is rich and beautiful, the story infused with magic throughout and the narrative interesting and full of many threads which all kept me hooked. Anyway, for more on these books just click onto my Instagram account (linked to the right).

McGilloway

With Brian McGilloway

Our March read is a crime fiction novel by New York Times best-selling author, Brian McGilloway, who hails from Derry in Northern Ireland – Little Girl Lost. Details in the next few weeks on what we thought of it!

NOIReland Crime Fiction Festival

In keeping with our crime-themed book club read for March, myself and fellow book-clubber Julie went along to the launch event of the NOIReland Crime Fiction Festival at the Europa Hotel in Belfast at the beginning of March. I haven’t really read much crime since I was a teenager, but I’ve interviewed a fair few crime authors from NI over the years and I know lots of local writers, so we had a great time looking for (and photographing) authors at the launch.noireland

We were also gifted a free book (there were a few left over at the end, so we nabbed a second!) and the weekend itself seemed to have gone very well. On the way out, we bumped into none other than Brian McGilloway himself, so we had to get a wee snap with him too. 🙂

Phantom Phantasia at the Causeway Visitors’ Centre

On the day of the NOIReland launch, I also delivered a few boxes of my second middle grade novel Phantom Phantasia, to the Giant’s Causeway Visitor Centre, along with several more boxes of book one (Magical Masquerade).

It’s great that both books are now stocked in the shop, so if you’re visiting and want to pick up a copy of either, please do!Causeway shop

World Book Day dress-up!

Keeping with the books… I was delighted when a young local reader decided to dress up for World Book Day as the main character in MM and PP (Felicity Stone). I haven’t included her pic here but it’s over on my author FB page if you want to take a look. 🙂

Coffee shop writing…

Aside from all of that, I’ve also been writing odds and ends of poetry recently and also working on my next middle grade novel. In fact, I even decided to try a spot of writing in a local coffee shop back in February (not normally what I do at all, as it’s too noisy – and it was), and I discovered it had become fully dog-friendly. Ergo, my next few visits to Koko Coffee Shop in Portrush were with my pup and no more coffee shop writing was done!reuben

Coleraine library reopened

Unfortunately, lots of libraries are being forced to close or operate with reduced opening hours in the UK these days, but fortunately for us on the North Coast, Coleraine Library just recently reopened after what I believe was a £2.5m refurb. I haven’t used the library in years, as I do like to keep my books, but I’ve already been along twice now to borrow books and it’s been great! I’m very glad to see our local library being looked after.

Anyway, more as I have it. 🙂

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Get lost in a library

A library I visited in Vienna

A library I visited in Vienna

As someone who grew up with a love of reading in the pre-internet age (yes, really) – before the invention of e-books and digital, well, anything really, the local library was the holy grail of book lovers everywhere. Period. I even remember the library van – that clumsy looking box-shaped old van which had seen better days but which was stuffed with tomes of all shapes and sizes. I devoured my library books from the town where I lived, but I also played away when I could, taking great delight to hop on board the big library van when it rolled into the village where my granny lived.

Vienese library books

Vienese library books

Yes, it was to convenience the elderly, who perhaps couldn’t always make the journey into the nearest town to satisfy their craving for stories, but us kids could certainly join in the party. It also gave the already exciting library visit an even more thrilling edge. What wonderful stories would the library van bring this week? Would they find out you were secretly borrowing books from your local town library, the library in the seaside town where you holidayed every summer and the library van?! Which was actually, technically, for people like your dear old granny to use! And what if that big old van accidentally trundled off with you in it?! It was a little Tardis-like inside and one very easily forgot about any sort of time dimension once on board… The vans spent only a certain amount of time in each town or village, so the added thrill was trying to return your books, find new ones and hop off again before they spirited you away.

Words of wisdom from NYC library

Words of wisdom from NYC library

Although – a life on the library van? There are worse ways to end up I’d say!

Alas, I know not the fate of library vans and whilst I’d love to think they still trundle faithfully around the country giving elderly people and little kids bookish delight every week, I’m pretty sure the digital age has put paid to that (correct me if I’m wrong though).

I now live in a digital world and am of a generation which was probably the last to be able to say – I grew up without mobile phones, the internet etc etc. Don’t get me wrong – the digital age is great. I use it every day, although I’m yet to read an e-book or buy a Kindle-type device. I do now have a proper smart phone though, so progress.

Whether you’ve grown up reading online books and articles, or are an older convert to the digital word, I do hope that there are some of you who recall with fondness your favourite library, and encourage the kids you know to seek them out. I recently saw a rather depressing (for me anyway!) photo of a completely digitised library online – that is, one with two rows of computers and NO BOOKS. A small part of me shrivelled up and died as I realised this could well be the fate of libraries not too far into the future. Perhaps not – I know many old diehards like me still enjoy the physically printed book and use both digital and hard copy interchangeably. Will future generations? I don’t know.

Reading area in NYC library

Reading area in NYC library

All I know is that I need to visit my local library more and help give them a reason to continue. I prefer to buy my books these days – mostly from second-hand bookshops – and I don’t quite know when this obsession to have to own every novel I read quite took hold. I read so many books as a child which I happily gave back to my libraries, although I do wish some of them I could have kept and I’m sure I’ve forgotten so many of the titles I enjoyed.

The original Winnie-the-Pooh & Piglet. You never know who you'll meet in a library...

The original Winnie-the-Pooh & Piglet. You never know who you’ll meet in a library…

I think perhaps I just like to look at them on my bookcases as to me, they’re homely; they’re a reminder of all the adventures I’ve taken; all the places I’ve visited; the characters I’ve met – liked, disliked, loved and loathed. They have beautiful covers (I like this!); they’re dog-eared/pristine/well-worn. They remind me of where I was when I read them; who I was with; what I was like then.

My last library cards...

My last library cards…

Libraries were a big part of my youth and I whiled many a summer’s day away with a stack of library books beside me. I progressed from the standard four library cards, to seven (delight!) and then, when computers took off – to the plastic swipe card. I still have some of my old yellowy-brown paper library cards, which the librarian would use to hold the little white slips of paper from the books I’d chosen, until I returned them and she’d fill them with more little white slips.

Libraries I loved and I always seek them out where possible when I go away. While they’re still here in traditional form I’d say – take yourself off and get lost in a library…

 

 

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