Tag Archives: fantasy fiction

From proofs to publication…

If you follow my author Facebook page (Claire Savage – Author) then you’ll know that my proof copies of Magical Masquerade finally arrived on Good Friday! I watched the delivery van pull up with an immense sigh of relief, as the proofs were more than two weeks overdue, which has set me back those two weeks in terms of my publication date.

IMG_1277Although I was trying to be patient and play it cool with the original order, once it got to 12 days beyond the agreed delivery date (which was March 30), I contacted CreateSpace to see what was what. As I’m based in the UK, this meant having to wait 24 hours for a reply, what with the time difference, but they got back to me quickly and sent me the tracking details of the original order… which seemed to show that they were delivered on the evening of March 29! Yes, I was a little confused as well, given that I work from home and was readily available to spy couriers approaching the house…

Thankfully, despite this ‘evidence’ of proofs delivered, CreateSpace believed me when I said they hadn’t arrived and sent me another batch, which arrived three days later, on April 14. I still don’t know what happened with the first batch, but credit is due to CreateSpace for their speedy resolution of the problem. On Good Friday I had my proofs, and I was very happy…

So – what of the books themselves? Well, after all of the drama surrounding their delivery, I was delighted to see that they didn’t disappoint with their appearance in any way. Simply put – I think they look brilliant and I’m very pleased with the quality of the paperback in every way.IMG_1276

I chose a matt cover and it looks and feels fantastic. The cardboard is a little thinner than the cover of a traditionally published paperback, but I knew that beforehand and I still think it works very well. As it’s a children’s book, the font is a bit bigger than it would be for an adult novel but I checked it against recently published children’s books for the same age-group that I have at home and it seems to match up well so, thankfully, I don’t need to make any changes to this, which is music to my ears.

That being said, the point of a proof is to allow you to go through the book with a fine toothcomb now that it’s in bound book form, to catch any outstanding errors that might have been missed in the final manuscript proofing stages. What could possibly have been missed after countless edits, you might ask? Well, you’d be surprised. We’ve all seen the odd typo, punctuation error or otherwise in published books which are scoured by multiple editors, proofreaders and publishers, so something is always bound to slip through. However, going through the proof at this stage again seeks to weed out the most obvious of these and yes – something generally always needs fixed.

boojksFor me, the main thing to amend is a bit of my back matter, as the text on one of the final pages starts too far down the page, so that needs to be pulled back to the top. Other than that, I’m midway through reading the book again and have noted a few words which have caps when they shouldn’t, a few words I want to change, and a few small spacing errors between words. Small things, but things which will make the book better once fixed.

So, what does all this mean for my April publication date..? Well, if it wasn’t for the two weeks past waiting for proofs which never came, then I would be firmly on track with my chosen publication date. That being said, this hasn’t put me too far off that, so all is good. The e-book will still be released on April 29 and I hope that by next weekend I will be hitting ‘publish’ on the paperback. However, as I’ve said before, once I approve the book for publication, it can take two weeks or so for it to appear on Amazon, so it could be the first week or two in May before you’ll actually be able to buy it.

And guess what…? I’m not stressing about that.FullSizeRender

I’ve waited a long time to get my book ‘out there’ and there’s no point rushing things at this final stage only for errors to slip through the net. A couple of weeks overdue is fine – I get to decide my publication date and, well, sometimes these things just happen. Proofs get lost in transit and things get delayed, but we get there in the end. In the traditional publishing world, once an author gets their proofs it’s generally still a few months more until the book is published, as that time is used to whip the book into the best shape it can be in. So, my extra few weeks is nothing – and a stage no writer can really afford to skip.

So, my timeline leading up to publication is now as follows:

  • Finish reading Magical Masquerade today and note any further edits required.
  • Make all final changes to the manuscript tomorrow (Easter Monday); convert to PDF and upload final-ever version to CreateSpace once again.
  • Wait 24 hours for CreateSpace to approve the uploaded manuscript (checking it’s formatted correctly for them to print). In the meantime, make the same changes I made to the paperback to the e-book and re-upload the final version of that to KDP.
  • Wednesday: The book should be approved on CreateSpace and ready for me to order another proof if I so wish. I do wish. Why? Because I’m a paranoid sort of a writer and I need to see the final version is what I want it to be! I will choose fastest-ever shipping though, so the book will be with me by next weekend. (Fingers crossed it doesn’t go AWOL like before!!).
  • Next weekend: Receive my shiny new proof copy from the courier (who now knows where I live, so there’s no excuse) and check over it before hitting ‘publish’.
  • Wait one, two or three weeks (who knows?!) until the book appears on Amazon for sale and then let you all know about it. 🙂
  • Celebrate publication day (when the book is live on Amazon to purchase) with a day of social media shenanigans – I will be tweeting and Facebooking all the day long my friends … you have been warned!

So, that’s my schedule ahead of publication. I also have the four proof copies from Friday to deliver to a few people who need to see them for various reasons. It irks me slightly that I’m giving these over with the final changes not yet made, but that’s just the way of it!

Incubator Journal interview

IncubatorIn other news… I was also recently interviewed about my writing and about Magical Masquerade by Kelly Creighton of the Incubator Journal, which was published yesterday, so if you want to have a read of that you can do so here: https://issuu.com/theincubatorjournal/docs/the_incubator._issue_12

I love the cover of this and what’s more, it was designed with a nod to MM, which was a lovely thing to do!

Anyway, that’s my updates for now. More as I have it!

Pre-order the Magical Masquerade e-book here: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B06XQ2GF27

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Fillory – and further…

If my title makes any sort of sense to you, then you will also be a reader of the Lev Grossman Magicians trilogy – or be watching the 5* TV series inspired by the same. The world of Fillory has been described as being like a Narnia for adults or, if you’re watching the show, it’s been referred to as a grown-up Harry Potter tale. The TV and book versions differ a fair bit in their form, as is to be expected, though their make-up remains very much the same…

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My feeling is that, as we all know, there are no really original stories left in this, or any other, world. Hence, there will always be comparisons to those novels which came before. Of course in reality, Brakebills College for Magical Pedagogy, isn’t really like Hogwarts at all, and Fillory isn’t really like Narnia, though it’s easy to see why they’ve been compared. The ingredients are similar – young people learning magic and travelling to other worlds; a beast out to get them – it’s a new spin on a classic type of tale. Which is, of course, where the author’s skill comes into play – how Grossman makes his stories come alive in fresh and unusual ways.

His fans are pretty high-profile in the writing world, with the likes of Junot Diaz, George R. R. Martin and The New Yorker among the many to rave about the writing. All three books were also previously New York Times Bestsellers – which I love to see for  the fantasy fiction genre.

Usually, I prefer to have read the book before watching a film or TV version of it, as I like to have confirmed the characters and the landscape in my mind before the screen dictates it to me. However, I stumbled upon The Magicians TV series before buying the books, so have actually been reading and watching at the same time – which has made it interesting in terms of seeing how the scriptwriters have adapted the novels. I’m currently on the final part of the trilogy, but there are elements in the TV series which have migrated into the series already – the writers weaving the book narratives into the show in unexpected but very clever ways.

To be so far ahead in the books but to be watching the series at the same time, makes for an intriguing insight into how two types of writers create a story – for the page and for the screen. I can’t say which I prefer, to be honest, as they both tell the story in different ways, each one playing to its audience perfectly.

Lots of novels get adapted for stage and screen these days, so from a writer’s point of view, I think it’s useful to see how much a story may seem to change on screen, yet retain all the essential elements of the tale. Indeed, with TV always keen to add in a dash more drama to the mix, it can really bring a story to life…

I’ll always prefer to read the books – the page, after all, is where every story starts – but it must be nice for an author who’s achieved all they can with a book, to see their imaginings enjoy a second life on screen. I for one, can’t wait to see how it all ends…

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